Erin- Week 1

After years of consideration, declarations of intention, and general procrastination, I have decided it is finally time to test out my green thumb. I’ve spent years watching my mother and my grandfather grow vegetables, and I’m hoping some of their knowledge has rubbed off on me or there is an undiscovered gene that makes someone a successful gardener.The only catch to my master plan is that I live in a 750 Sq. ft. one bedroom apartment with no patio and no consistent access to a yard. But I figure, people grow flowers and herbs indoors all the time, so why can’t I?

My only option for a garden “plot” that offers both sufficient space and lighting is a small corner by the window that gets west-facing sunlight.  It’s not quite as well-lit as I would like, but I don’t think my apartment management company would appreciate me knocking holes in the wall to get a southern exposure.

Figuring out where to put my plants was easy because of my limited options, but I had to do some research online to figure out if there was an ideal vessel for my plants.  Given the space I am working in, a container garden is my only real option unless I want to be more high-tech and try hydroponics- which I don’t.  That leaves me with barrels, flower pots, cut-off milk and bleach jugs, recycled Styrofoam coolers, window boxes and baskets.  It turns out that it doesn’t really matter what container you use.  Any container will do as long as it follows these 3 rules:
*See http://www.ehow.com/how_7865079_choose-containers-garden.html or http://www.kiddiegardens.com/gardening_containers.html for more information.

  1. Be big enough to support plants when they are fully grown
  2. Have adequate drainage
  3. Never have held products that would be toxic to plants or people.*

I decided, for simplicities sake, to purchase a few plastic gardening pots from the hardware store to ensure that they had holes in the bottom for drainage and that I knew their capacity.  I would have preferred clay pots, but the plastic ones seemed to meet the criteria, and they were less expensive at $2- $6 each (depending on the size) versus .

Now that I have chosen my “plot”, I am ready to plant my herbs and vegetables next week!

 

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adventures in urban gardening